World Traveling Udon Maker's journey 世界を旅するうどん屋の旅

【World traveling Japanese handmade udon chef visits your kitchen. 世界を旅する本格手打ち讃岐うどん屋が、あなたのキッチンへ】 Bookings available from all over the world 世界中どこからでも予約お待ちしてます

Say hi first and you’ll see the different world 先手の挨拶は世界を変える(1)

 

f:id:zettodayo:20190811030051j:plain

f:id:zettodayo:20190811030108j:plain

f:id:zettodayo:20190811030118j:plain

Udon Challenge 272/1200 #georgia #tbilisi

Udon workshop for Asian food lovers in Tbilisi Georgia! They even tried for soup making and soba making!

アジア料理を愛する方々とのうどんワークショップ!出汁づくりやそば作りに挑戦したがるマニアっぷり。

f:id:zettodayo:20190811030543j:plain

f:id:zettodayo:20190811030802j:plain

Here I am in Tanzania all the way from Georgia! Photos with masai and of Zanzibar island.

ジョージアから遥々タンザニアにやってきました!噂のマサイ族と昔から良いと聞いていたザンジバル島。 

 

Say hi first and you’ll see the different world

There are villagers in India who rarely smile and never say hi to a foreigner like me. One of the reasons could be our caste difference. When they show me serious look with no smile, I often hesitate. But when I say “namaste (hi)” to them with a bit of braveness, they tend to smile back and I notice the importance of a greeting. Many travelers have similar experience and agree on this. In the first place, I am the Asian looking man who is walking on a street of their country. Some locals must haven’t seen a foreigner like me, so no wonder they get frightened.

In Iran I heard this word “Ching-chang-chong” said towards me countless times from local people. if you happen to be an Asian person living outside of your country, you might have heard this phrase, but it is said when making fun of Asian people. To be honest it was so irritating that I almost couldn’t bear it. But now when I think of it, I am thinking maybe I could have said “salam (hi)” in the first place before anything to be said, so probably was able to block their attack. Locals just would like to talk to a foreigner, just like, I, foreigner does. (Especially Iranians…)

Travelers often encounter pickpockets, and obviously the biggest reason is, I imagine, that they weren’t careful enough. But in my opinion, probably another reason is because they didn’t communicate enough with people around them. At hostels, in trains and buses, it’s important to say hi to people around. When people could change the way they judge you from you“foreigner with money” to “friendly guy who says hi” , I imagine that they would lose their motivation to do pickpockets.

(continues to next post...)


先手の挨拶は世界を変える

インドの特に田舎の方に行くとニコリともしない村人たちが結構いる。カーストなどの関係もあるのかもしれない。真顔で見つめられると、一瞬自分も怯むのだが、勇気を出して「ナマステ(こんにちは)」というと結構笑顔になったりする。言ってみるもんだな、とか思う。これは旅人みんな揃って同じこと感じているよう。そもそも見たこともないアジア人顔の人間が怯んだ顔で歩いてるわけである。相手だって、知らない外国人が怖いのだと思う。

イランで田舎の街を歩いていると「チンチャンチョン!」という言葉を100万回くらい浴びせられた。外国に住むアジア人なら知らない人は少ない(?)アジア人蔑視のお決まりフレーズである。それにしてもここまで言われたのは初めてで、1分間に10人くらいに言われるものだから、我慢の限界を迎え怒りが爆発しそうになっていた。でも今になって思えば、あれは相手から何かしら言われる前に「サラーム!(こんにちは)」を発動させておけば良かったのかもしれないと思う。相手だって、知らない外国人と絡みたいのである。(特にイラン人において)

旅人がスリに遭うは常であり、安全確認を怠ったというような基本的な部分での失敗が多いのは事実である。でも、実は最大のミスは「周りの人との簡単なコミュニケーションを怠っていたこと」な気がする。宿、電車やバスなど色々なシーンで、周りの人と挨拶すべきである。挨拶することで「金を持ってそうな外国人」という記号的存在から「挨拶してくれるナイスな兄ちゃん」という血の通った人間的存在になれば、スリをする気も起きないものだと、勝手に思っている。(ちなみに私は今の所金をすられたことはない・・・!と思っている)

 

((2)へ続く・・・)